Chronology
1677
KASPAR SCHULZ founded by Christian Schulz, coppersmith from Bamberg; Family chronicle documented in Bamberg’s Coppersmiths´ Guild Book; Inception of Kaspar-Schulz company; Copper brewing kettles already being produced in 1st generation
1703
Hanns Geörg Schulz (1677-1750) followed in his father’s footsteps to become a coppersmith. As the oldest son, he inherited his father’s workshop on December 26, 1703. Characteristic commissions of the times came from the Bamberg Cathedral chapter, who requested holy water vessels and copper pails for a baptismal font to be made for the cathedral’s crypt. The pails are still used today.

1747
Like his father, Tobias Schulz (1719-1767) was to learn the coppersmith’s trade and took over the workshop in 1747. As a master in the Bamberg Guild of Coppersmiths, Tobias played a meaningful roll. His most distinguished assignment came when he was commissioned to completely replace the trusses of the four towers of the Bamberg Cathedral. While carrying out a minor repair on one of the tower’s spires, Tobias slipped and fell to his death. To honor his life and his work, he was laid to rest in the cathedral’s cloister.
1768
Jörg Schulz (1748-1830) took over the workshop after the sudden and unexpected death of his father. At the time he was just 19 years old. Aside from producing and repairing brewing kettles, he consolidated business relations between the guild and the cathedral, as well as other churches in Bamberg.
1804
In 1804 coppersmith Andreas Schulz (1782-1865) took over his father's workshop. After the turn of the 19th century, the craft of coppersmiths in Bamberg was firmly in the hands of the Schulz family with two masters and three assistants. Andreas built what is now the oldest Schulz brewhouse still in operation, which is located today at the Franconian Open Air Museum in Bad Windsheim.
1853
Friedrich Schulz (1821-1874) was a man of many talents with an artistic, innovative streak. At the age of 21, he won first prize for his work at the Bamberg Industrial Exhibition. In 1851, he visited the World’s Fair in London as a coppersmith. He is responsible for crafting objects both technically and artistically sophisticated. He took over his father's business in 1853.
1874
Kaspar Schulz (1856-1915) just like his ancestors, was to become a coppersmith. He assumed control of the family business after his father's death in 1874. On March 13, 1879 Kaspar Schulz officially registered his business as a „Coppersmith and ironmonger with retail premises”. The company was to bear his name from that day forward. While he ran the company, it specialized mainly in producing brewing kettles.
1887
In light of growing demand, the headquarters in the Lower Kaulberg were no longer able to spatially accommodate production of, above all, larger brewing kettles. Kaspar Schulz's operations were therefore relocated to a larger site in the middle of Bamberg. Production was carried out at the new address––Frauenstraße 15––up until 1968.
1915
Adalbert Schulz (1888-1985) not only completed a coppersmith’s apprenticeship, he also studied machine engineering in Hanover. With this solid vocational training, he set out to lead the company into an industrial operation after the death of his father in 1915. As the demand for brewing machinery increased, the manufacturing of apparatuses began gaining a more important role.
1956
In 1956, owing yet again to the large spacial requirements for tank production, Adalbert Schulz initiated the contruction of a production facility for aluminum tanks on the northern outskirts of Bamberg, which is still the company's location today. Little by little the entire company was relocated to this site.
1968
Günter Schulz-Hess (born in 1943) headed the company as a machine engineer since the business moved to its new location on the periphery of Bamberg in 1968. Here he set milestones by implementing automation and computerization into the craft of brewing. These innovations would eventually lead to a trend in creating new small and medium-sized breweries at home and abroad, in which he played an important role.
2008
Since 2008 Johannes Schulz-Hess, a trained architect, heads the company in its 10th generation. These days, particular attention is given to company-led research, technological advancements, innovations in and improvements to the brewing process, energy efficiency in terms of CO2-free brewing, and sustainability.

History

It all began in 1677. The master copersmith Christian Schulz started his own business in Bamberg, supplying brewpubs with “finely forged and hammered copper kettles as a guarantee for quality beer.” During the next 300 years, Christian Schulz’s humble coppersmith business would develop into a successful enterprise in the brewing technology field. Schulz has become a trusted resource in brewing technology and a peerless consultant for a wide-reaching customer base both domestically and abroad. We stand by our principles of expertise and consistency in the industry.

Schulz Father & Son

1652–1732 Christian Schulz
1677–1750 Hanns Geörg Schulz
1719–1767 Tobias Schulz
1748–1830 Jörg Schulz
1782–1865 Andreas Schulz
1821–1874 Friedrich Schulz
1856–1915 Kaspar Schulz
1888–1985 Adalbert Schulz
geb. 1943 Günter Schulz-Hess
geb. 1976 Johannes Schulz-Hess
Coppersmith Christian Schulz married his foreman’s (the master coppersmith) widow on January 11, 1677 and took over the workshop, which he then carried on under his own name. With that began the SCHULZ company history over 336 years ago in Bamberg. From the very beginning, the company was affiliated with the Bamberg High Cathedral Chapter Guild of Coppersmiths.
Hanns Geörg Schulz followed in his father’s footsteps to become a coppersmith. As the oldest son, he inherited his father’s workshop on July 13, 1747. Characteristic commissions of the times came from the Bamberg Cathedral chapter, who requested holy water vessels and copper pails for a baptismal font to be made for the cathedral’s crypt. The pails are still used today.

Like his father, Tobias Schulz was to learn the coppersmith’s trade. As a master in the Bamberg Guild of Coppersmiths, Tobias played a meaningful roll. His most distinguished assignment came when he was commissioned to completely replace the trusses of the four towers of the Bamberg Cathedral. While carrying out a minor repair on one of the tower’s spires, Tobias slipped and fell to his death. To honor his life and his work, he was laid to rest in the cathedral’s cloister.
Jörg Schulz took over the workshop after the sudden and unexpected death of his father. At the time he was just 19 years old. Aside from producing and repairing brewing kettles, he consolidated business relations between the guild and the cathedral, as well as other churches in Bamberg.
Andreas Schulz was, of course, also a coppersmith. After the turn of the 19th century, the craft of coppersmiths in Bamberg was firmly in the hands of the Schulz family with two masters and three assistants. Andreas built what is now the oldest Schulz brewhouse still in operation, which is located today at the Franconian Open Air Museum in Bad Windsheim.
Friedrich Schulz was a man of many talents with an artistic, innovative streak. At the age of 21, he won first prize for his work at the Bamberg Industrial Exhibition. In 1851, he visited the World’s Fair in London as a coppersmith. He is responsible for crafting objects both technically and artistically sophisticated.
Kaspar Schulz, just like his ancestors, was to become a coppersmith. On March 13, 1879 Kaspar Schulz officially registered his business as a „Coppersmith and ironmonger with retail premises”. The company was to bear his name from that day forward. While he ran the company, it specialized mainly in producing brewing kettles. His business was so successful that he had the workshop moved to a new, larger production site in the middle of Bamberg.
Adalbert Schulz not only completed a coppersmith’s apprenticeship, he also studied machine engineering in Hanover. With this solid education and practical experience, he set out to make the company into an industrial operation. As the demand for brewing machinery increased, the manufacturing of apparatuses began gaining a more important role.
Günter Schulz-Hess headed the company as a machine engineer since the business moved to its new location on the periphery of Bamberg in 1968. Here he set milestones by implementing automation and computerization into the craft of brewing. These innovations would eventually lead to a trend in creating new small and medium-sized breweries at home and abroad, in which he played an important role.
Johannes Schulz-Hess, a trained architect, now heads the company in its 10th generation. These days, particular attention is given to company-led research, technological advancements, innovations in and improvements to the brewing process, energy efficiency in terms of CO2-free brewing, and sustainability.